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Found Anemia 42 times.

Displaying results 1 to 10.

1. -emia (adj.: -emic)
A suffix indicating that the word has to do with the blood, a condition of the blood, a substance within the blood, etc. For example, anemia is the lack of sufficient functioning hemoglobin in the blood. "-emic" is a

2. Abnormal hemoglobin
Hemoglobin molecule with a different shape due to an altered amino acid sequence (ultimately caused by an altered DNA base sequence), such as in the inherited disease sickle-cell anemia .

3. African sleeping sickness
A disease affecting humans and other mammals in central Africa that is caused by the parasitic protozoa ns Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and is transmitted by the tsetse fly. Symptoms include fever, chills, headache, vomiting, pain in the extremities, lymph gland enlargement, anemia, depression, fatigue, coma, and eventually death if left untreated. The trypanosome is able to evade the host's immune system by frequently changing the protein s on its outer surface, by which the immune system identifies intruders.

4. Alpha thalassemia
One of two major types of thalassemia , a genetically inherited disease, in which one of the two types of polypeptide s making up the hemoglobin protein is defective or missing. Hemoglobin proteins are composed of four polypeptides -- two "alpha chains" and two "beta chains". In alpha thalassemia, the alpha chains are defective or missing (see also beta thalassemia ). This disease mainly affects individuals of Southeast Asian, Chinese, and Filipino ancestry; in its most severe form it results in the death of the fetus or newborn. Individuals with less severe cases have varying degrees of anemia .

5. Anemia (adj.: anemic)
A condition where there is a lower than normal amount of hemoglobin in the blood and red blood cell production is reduced. Often causes pallor and fatigue.

6. Babesiasis (babesiosis, piroplasmosis)
A parasitic disease affecting mammals which is caused by protozoa from the genus Babesia of the order Piroplasmida and is transmitted by ticks. The Babesia protozoa feed on the blood of mammals. Symptoms include high fever, anemia , and red urine (hemoglobinuria).

7. Beta thalassemia
This form of thalassemia is due to point mutation s, further subdivided according to pathogenesis: * beta thalassemia major: in this form of beta thalassemia, patients are homozygous for the defective genes: beta0, homozygous beta+, both are life-threatening. * beta thalassemia minor: patients are heterozygous for the defective gene; they have a mild anemia .

8. Beta thalassemia (Cooley's anemia)
One of two major types of thalassemia , a genetically inherited disease, where one of the two types of polypeptide s making up the hemoglobin protein is defective or missing. Hemoglobin proteins are composed of four polypeptides -- two "alpha chains" and two "beta chains". In beta thalassemia, the beta chains are defective or missing (see also alpha thalassemia ). The three classifications of beta thalassemia, in order of increasing severity, are thalassemia minor, thalassemia intermedia, and thalassemia major. Thalassemia major is also known as Cooley's anemia. Symptoms include slow growth, jaundice , enlarged heart, liver, and spleen , thinned bones. Untreated children die young, usually of heart failure or infections. Thalassemia intermedia produces milder symptoms for the first two decades of life in most cases. Thalassemia minor may not produce any symptoms, though changes in the blood occur.

9. Dactylitis
Dactylitis is inflammation of fingers and toes, e.g. as caused by tissue ischemia due to sickle cell anemia.

10. Erythroblastosis fetalis
A type of anemia which can occur in newborns that have Rh+ blood and which are born to mothers with Rh- blood (see Rh factor ). Symptoms include lots of erythroblast cells which are circulating in the blood instead of being within bone marrow, liver and spleen enlargement, and edema (tissue swelling due to excessive fluid).


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