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Found Axon 82 times.

Displaying results 1 to 10.

1. Archaea
Proposed, but not widely accepted, sixth taxonomic kingdom that would include the archaebacteria.

2. Axon
The threadlike extensions on a neuron , or nerve cell which conducts nerve impulses.

3. Axonal neuropathy
This type of neuropathy is caused by nutritional deficiencies and poisoning by toxic substances.

4. Axoneme
The structure of an eukaryotic flagellum or cilium (long whiplike or hairlike appendages sometimes attached to cells), where two microtubule s in the center are surrounded by nine pairs of microtubules around the outside.

5. Axons
Long fibers that carry signals away from the cell body of a neuron .

6. Binomial system of nomenclature
A system of taxonomy developed by Linnaeus in the early eighteenth century. Each species of plant and animal receives a two-term name; the first term is the genus, and the second is the species.

7. Birds
Taxonomic class of terrestrial vertebrates that are characterized by endothermy and feathers; descended from some group of reptiles (or possibly dinosaurs).

8. Brassica (Brassicaceae, Cruciferae)
A genus of plants belonging to the mustard family Brassicaceae. The whole family includes a total of 376 different genera and 3,200 different species . The family is also known as "Cruciferae" because the four petaled flowers of these plants look like crosses. The plants are distributed worldwide and have annual (living one year), biennial (living two years) and perennial (living many years) members. Member species of genus Brassica include Brassica napus which produces rapeseed or canola oil; Brassica nigra which produces yellow mustard; Brassica oleracea whose subspecies and strains include kale and collard greens (B. oleracea acephala), broccoli (B. oleracea botrytis), cauliflower (B. oleracea cauliflora), head cabbage (B. oleracea capitata), brussel sprouts (B. oleracea gemmifera), and kohlrabi (B. oleracea gongycoides); and Brassica rapa, whose subspecies include pak choi (B. rapa chinensis), Chinese cabbage (B. rapa pekinensis), and turnip (B. rapa rapifera). Also, one subspecies of B. rapa is used as a model organism to study genetics , molecular biology , plant breeding, cell biology , and physiology ; it is called the "rapid cycling" Brassica or RCBr or the Wisconsin Fast PlantTM , and was developed specifically for scientific study. Additionally, the radish Raphanus sativus is a member of the Brassicaceae family. The full taxonom ic classification is kingdom Plantae, division Tracheophyta, subdivision Spermatophyta, class Angiospermae, subclass Dicotyledeonae, order Papaverales, family Brassicaceae.

9. Caenorhabiditis elegans
This is a free-living (non parasitic) species of nematode which makes a good model organism for biological study because it has a small genome of only six chromosome s. It also has a short generation time of about three days (at room temperature), and is easy to grow at high densities (up to 10,000 worms on one Petri dish). C. elegans has been thoroughly studied by geneticist s, developmental biologist s and neurologists. The worms can be used to study genetic manipulation , gene therapy , and the molecular basis of differentiation during development. Much of the world's knowledge about aging, inheritance, and the factors which control gene expression during development comes from studying this and other nematodes. The full taxonomic classification of C. elegans is: kingdom Animalia, phylum Nematoda, class Secernentea, subclass Rhabditia, order Rhabditida, family Rhabditidae.

10. Cell body
In nerve cells, this is the central portion containing the cell nucleus , from which axon s and dendrite s sprout. The cell body is primarily concerned with carrying out the life-sustaining functions of a cell.


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