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Found Electron 95 times.

Displaying results 1 to 10.

1. Acid (adj. acidic) (Arrhenius acid, Lewis acid, Bronsted acid)
A fundamental category of many compounds whose water-based solutions have a sour taste, turn blue litmus paper red, and can combine with metals to form salts. Acids have a pH lower than 7 (strong acids have a pH of less than 3). Specific types of acids include: * Arrhenius acid: any chemical that increases the number of free hydrogen ions (H+) when they're added to a water-based solution. The more free hydrogens produced, the stronger the acid. * Brnsted or Brnsted-Lowry acid: any chemical that acts as a proton donor in a chemical reaction. * Lewis acid: any chemical that accepts two electrons to form a covalent bond during a chemical reaction.

2. Aerobe
An organism that can or must live in an oxygen-containing environment and which uses oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor in respiration.

3. Ambident anion
A group of atoms that carry an overall negative charge and which can donate electrons to electron acceptors such as metal atoms.

4. Ambident ligand
A ligand that can donate electrons through two or more atoms on their molecule.

5. Anaerobic respiration
Respiration under anaerobic conditions. The terminal electron acceptor , instead of oxygen in the case of regular respiration, can be: CO2, Fe2+, fumarate, nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, sulphur, sulphate, etc. Note that anaerobic respiration still uses the electron transport chain to dump the electron while fermentation does not.

6. Anoxic culture
A culture of anaerobic microbes which use inorganic substances other than oxygen as their terminal electron acceptor s.

7. Antimycin A
This antibiotic is used to kill fungi , insects and mites; it works by blocking mitochondrial respiration by interrupting the electron transport chain in those organelle s.

8. Atom
This is the tiniest particle of matter that retains the chemical properties of an element; atoms are typically composed of neutral subatomic particles (neutrons), positively-charged particles (protons) and negatively-charged particles (electrons).

9. Base (alkali, Bronsted base, Arrhenius base, Lewis base)
A fundamental category of many compounds whose water-based solutions have a bitter taste, a slippery feel in water, turn red litmus paper blue, and can react with acid s to form salts. A base has a pH higher than 7; a strong base will have a pH of 13 or higher. Specific types of bases include: * Arrhenius base: any chemical that increases the number of free hydroxide ion s (OH-) when they're added to a water-based solution. The more ions produced, the stronger the acid. * Bronsted or Bronsted-Lowry base: any chemical that acts as a proton acceptor in a chemical reaction. * Lewis base: any chemical that donates two electrons to form a covalent bond during a chemical reaction.

10. Beta decay
Type of radioactive decay in which a radioisotope emits a small, negatively-charged and fast-moving particle from its nucleus. The beta particle is similar in size, charge, and speed to an electron and is formed when a neutron in the radioisotope's nucleus converts to a proton.


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