BioScience Dictionary

 
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | Ot.

Found Physiology 9 times.

Displaying results 1 to 10.

1. Absorption
The process of absorbing; specifically: * In physiology, it refers to the movement of liquids and solute s into cells by way of diffusion or osmosis. * In chemistry, it refers to the drawing of a gas or liquid into the pores of a permeable solid. * In immunology, it refers to a process in which an antigen or antibody is used to pull an analogous antigen or antibody out of a solution. Compare adsorption .

2. Biomedical engineering
The use of engineering technology, instrumentation and methods to solve medical problems, such as improving our understanding of physiology and the manufacture of artificial limbs and organs.

3. Biophysiology
Biophysiology is the scientific study of how non-human organisms function.

4. Brassica (Brassicaceae, Cruciferae)
A genus of plants belonging to the mustard family Brassicaceae. The whole family includes a total of 376 different genera and 3,200 different species . The family is also known as "Cruciferae" because the four petaled flowers of these plants look like crosses. The plants are distributed worldwide and have annual (living one year), biennial (living two years) and perennial (living many years) members. Member species of genus Brassica include Brassica napus which produces rapeseed or canola oil; Brassica nigra which produces yellow mustard; Brassica oleracea whose subspecies and strains include kale and collard greens (B. oleracea acephala), broccoli (B. oleracea botrytis), cauliflower (B. oleracea cauliflora), head cabbage (B. oleracea capitata), brussel sprouts (B. oleracea gemmifera), and kohlrabi (B. oleracea gongycoides); and Brassica rapa, whose subspecies include pak choi (B. rapa chinensis), Chinese cabbage (B. rapa pekinensis), and turnip (B. rapa rapifera). Also, one subspecies of B. rapa is used as a model organism to study genetics , molecular biology , plant breeding, cell biology , and physiology ; it is called the "rapid cycling" Brassica or RCBr or the Wisconsin Fast PlantTM , and was developed specifically for scientific study. Additionally, the radish Raphanus sativus is a member of the Brassicaceae family. The full taxonom ic classification is kingdom Plantae, division Tracheophyta, subdivision Spermatophyta, class Angiospermae, subclass Dicotyledeonae, order Papaverales, family Brassicaceae.

5. Chlamydomonas
A genus of green algae consisting of more than 600 species worldwide, living in marine, freshwater, soil, and even snow environments. They are single cell ed eukaryotic organisms ranging from 5 to 100 micrometers long which can be roughly spherical, egg shaped, or elliptical. Most species have two flagella (coming out the same side) for swimming. Most of the time they are haploid and reproduce by dividing into two ( binary fission ); when they are stressed they can form gamete s which fuse to form diploid cyst s which later divide into four haploid cells. Taxonomically they have been classified under plants, animals, and protist s. Several species from this genus are important model organisms for the study of cell biology , molecular biology , genetics , plant physiology , and biotechnology . The species most commonly used in scientific experiments is Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (also known as C. reinhardi or C. reinhardii).

6. Crick, Francis
An English biologist born in 1916 who was one of three people to win the Nobel Prize in 1962 for the category of physiology or medicine. He and James Watson , an American biochemist and alumnus of Indiana University, discovered the double-stranded helix structure of the DNA molecule and built the Watson-Crick model of this structure. Their work was heavily based on the work of Maurice Wilkins (who also won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 1962) and Rosalind Franklin (who died before the 1962 Nobel Prize winners were selected). The model they postulated is the accepted model used today.

7. Physiology
The study of how living organisms function.

8. Structure-functionalism
The scientific tradition that stresses the relationship between a physical structure and its function, for example, the related disciplines of anatomy and physiology.

9. Watson, James Dewey
An American biochemist and alumnus of Indiana University born in 1928 who was one of three people to win the Nobel Prize in 1962 for the category of physiology or medicine. He and Francis Crick , an English biologist, discovered the double-stranded helix structure of the DNA molecule and built the Watson-Crick model of this structure. Their work was heavily based on the work of Maurice Wilkins (who also won the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 1962) and Rosalind Franklin (who died before the 1962 Nobel Prize winners were selected). The model they postulated is the accepted model used today.

View web definitions »

Learn more about Physiology »