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Found Symbiosis 18 times.

Displaying results 1 to 10.

1. Amensalism (adj. amensal)
A type of symbiosis where two (or more) organisms from different species live in close proximity to one another, where one of the members suffers as a result of the relationship while the other is unaffected by it.

2. Antibiosis
A relationship between two species in which one species is actively harmed (as by the production of toxin s by the harming species). Compare symbiosis .

3. Commensalism (commensal)
A type of symbiosis where two (or more) organisms from different species live in close proximity to one another, in which one member is unaffected by the relationship and the other benefits from it.

4. Cytobiosis
A type of symbiosis in which one partner lives inside the cell or cells of the other.

5. Ectosymbiont
An organism which is participating in ectosymbiosis (a form of symbiosis in which the organisms involved are physically separated).

6. Ectosymbiosis
symbiosis between two organisms which are physically separated from each other. Compare endosymbiosis.

7. Endosymbiosis
A symbiotic relationship between two organism s in which one of the two organisms (the endosymbiont ) lives inside the body of the other one (the host ). Compare ectosymbiosis .

8. Endosymbiosis theory
The scientific theory that the organelle s of eukaryotic cell s arose when free-living procaryotic cells began living within other, larger free-living procaryotic cells and formed mutualistic symbiotic relationships with them.

9. Endosymbiosis
Theory that attempts to explain the origin of the DNA-containing mitochondria and chloroplasts in early eukaryotes by the engulfing of various types of bacteria that were not digested but became permanent additions to the ancestral "eukaryote".

10. Endosymbiotic infection (endosymbiosis)
A situation where a cell that has been infected by a virus is prevented from dividing but is not immediately killed.


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