BioScience Dictionary

 
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Found Triploblastic 6 times.

Displaying results 1 to 10.

1. Acoelomate
A triploblastic organism which does not have an internal body cavity other than the gut. The area between the gut and the organism's outer body wall is completely filled with tissue derived from the mesoderm . The term is used to classify multicellular animals by developmental pattern.

2. Coelom
An internal fluid-filled body cavity (other than the gut) within an organism; it lies between the gut (derived from the endoderm ) and the outer body wall (derived from the ectoderm ) and is lined entirely with tissue derived from the mesoderm . It is formed from the mesoderm during embryo nic development. It is found in triploblastic animals called coelomate s.

3. Coelomate
A triploblastic organism which has an internal, fluid-filled body cavity which originated from the mesoderm during embryo nic development. This cavity surrounds the gut, may contain various other organs, and is called a coelom . It differs from the pseudocoel s of the pseudocoelomate s because it is not derived from the blastocoel . The term is used to classify multicellular animals by developmental pattern.

4. Diploblastic
Describes an animal which, as an embryo , had two distinct embryonic tissue layers - the ectoderm and endoderm . This is in contrast to animals which are triploblastic (has three distinct tissue layers) and those which do not have any distinct tissue layers as an embryo (nor organs and distinct tissues as an adult). Jellyfish and comb jellies are diploblastic animals.

5. Pseudocoelomate
A triploblastic organism which has an internal, fluid-filled body cavity derived from the blastocoel of the embryo . This cavity surrounds the gut, may contain various other organs, and is called the pseudocoel . It differs from the coelom s of true coelomate s because it is not derived from or completely lined with tissue derived from the mesoderm . The term is used to classify multicellular animals by developmental pattern.

6. Triploblastic
Describes an animal which, as an embryo , had three distinct embryonic tissue layers - the ectoderm , mesoderm , and endoderm . This is in contrast to animals which are diploblastic (has two distinct tissue layers) and those which do not have any distinct tissue layers as an embryo (nor organs and distinct tissues as an adult).