Portal:New York

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The New York State Portal

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New York /njˈjɔrk/ is a state in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regions of the United States. New York City and Long Island are located on the southeastern-most part of lower New York State, and Upstate New York is in the north.

New York is bordered by Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania; it shares a water border with Rhode Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario. New York is the United States' third most populous state.

The Algonquian, Iroquois, and Lenape Native American groups inhabited New York when Dutch and French nationals moved into the region in the early 17th century. First claimed by Henry Hudson in 1609, the region came to have Dutch forts in Fort Orange by 1614, near the site of the present-day state capital, Albany. The state was colonized by the Dutch in 1624, at both Albany and Manhattan; it later fell to British annexation in 1664. About one third of all of the battles of the Revolutionary War took place in New York. It became an independent state on July 9, 1776 and enacted its constitution in 1777. The state ratified the United States Constitution on July 26, 1788 to become the 11th state. According to the United States Department of Commerce, New York is the state of choice for foreign visitors, leading Florida and California in tourism.

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Hunter Mountain, as seen from Black Dome.

Hunter Mountain is located in the towns of Hunter and Lexington, just south of the village of Hunter, in Greene County, New York, USA. At approximately 4,040 feet (1,234 m) in elevation, it is the highest peak in the county and the second-highest peak in the Catskill Mountains.

While the mountain is closely associated with the highly popular eponymous ski area built around the Colonel's Chair ridge at the mountain's northwest corner, that takes up only a small portion of the mountain. The actual summit, some distance from the ski area, is graced with a fire lookout tower, the highest in the state and second-highest in the Northeast. The former road to it is open to hikers, horses (and possibly mountain bikers in the future). It is the most popular route to the mountain's summit. Hunter takes the shape of a medium-length ridge, rising steeply from Stony Clove Notch in the east, then gently to the summit in the center, and gently back down to the west where the land makes a much less steep drop into Taylor Hollow, the col between it and neighboring Rusk Mountain. As with its eastern neighbor Plateau Mountain, there is a considerable amount of level ground above 3,500 feet (1,067 m), the cutoff elevation for inclusion in the Catskill High Peaks.

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The former World Trade Center.
Credit: Jeffmock

The World Trade Center in New York City, United States, (sometimes informally referred to as the WTC or the Twin Towers) was a complex of seven buildings in Lower Manhattan, mostly designed by architect Minoru Yamasaki and engineer Leslie Robertson and developed by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. It was initiated in 1960 by a Lower Manhattan Association created and chaired by David Rockefeller, who had the original idea of building the center, with strong backing from the then-New York governor, his brother Nelson Rockefeller.

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Brooklyn, birthplace of Henry Gross.

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William King Gregory (May 19, 1876 – December 29, 1970) was an American zoologist, renowned as a primatologist, paleontologist, and functional and comparative morphologist. He was an expert on mammalian dentition, and a leading contributor to theories of evolution. In addition he was active in presenting his ideas to students and the general public through books and museum exhibits. He was born in Greenwich Village, New York on 19 May 1876 to George Gregory and Jane King Gregory. He attended Trinity School and then moved to Columbia University in 1895, initially at the School of Mines but then transferring to Columbia College. He majored in zoology and vertebrate paleontology under Henry Fairfield Osborn. While still an undergraduate he became Osborn's research assistant and soon after married Laura Grace Foote. He received his undergraduate degree from Columbia in 1900, followed by a masters in 1905, and a doctorate in 1910.

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Tower number 16, preserved in Irvington
  • ...that the Yonkers Chiefs, a former Basketball team based in Yonkers, only played once during the 1946/47 season?
  • ...that the Croton Aqueduct was used as a water supply by several residents of Manhattan due to the lack of fresh water available on the island at the time?
  • ...that despite intentions to open the Crouse College, Syracuse University as a women-only college, his son opened it as open to both genders after his father, John Crouse, died during its construction?

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O. Henry (real name: William Sydney Porter) in his thirties.
It couldn't have happened anywhere but in little old New York.

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Central Park, in New York City
Credit: Summ

Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres (3.41 km2); a rectangle 2.6 statute miles by 0.5 statute mile, or 4.1 km × 830 m) in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. With about twenty-five million visitors annually, Central Park is the most visited city park in The United States, and its appearance in many movies and television shows has made it famous.

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